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Grey Seal Cull is Science Fraud

http://www.gopetition.com/petitions/grey-seal-cull-is-science-fraud.html

Background (Preamble):
As usual the Canadian government is using the seals as a political ruse to satisfy the sealers and they say the seal cull is based on science (contained in some private ‘committee report’) . This is nonsense and the government and the DFO knows it . The seal cull would cost 35 million and would be the worst thing for Canada . It would be a national embarrassment , a purely political exercise and an environmental disaster ; it would likely also be an economic disaster , damaging any potential tourism to the region , as no one wants to visit an open air slaughterhouse .

Petition:

This slaughter needs to stop and the government needs to know that Canadians will not tolerate such action against the seals .

Please sign this petition and let the fisheries minister and the DFO know that there will be serious consequences for this seal cull if it were to go though . The time to end to this is now .

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Minister says proposed grey seal cull based on science

The Canadian Press
Date: Tuesday Nov. 8, 2011 4:22 PM ET
FREDERICTON — Canada’s fisheries minister is shrugging off accusations that a proposed cull of 140,000 Atlantic grey seals is being driven by politics, not science, saying “seals aren’t vegetarians or vegans — they eat fish.”

Keith Ashfield

Keith Ashfield

Keith Ashfield responded Tuesday to four marine biologists at Dalhousie University in Halifax who say the five-year plan submitted for his approval is aimed only at appeasing fishermen as they struggle with dwindling cod stocks.

The scientists wrote an open letter to the minister in September, saying the proposal can’t be justified by existing scientific evidence. They said the proposal, drafted by a group of federal scientists and industry representatives, was biased because it focused only on the negative impact of grey seals.

The minister, in Fredericton for a funding announcement, said Tuesday the proposal is based on rigorous scientific research that concludes hungry grey seals are the most likely reason why cod stocks are not recovering in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence.

“The information we received, based on science through a committee report, was that on the grey seal issue that they are having an impact on the cod stocks,” Ashfield told reporters.

“They have suggested up to 70,000 seals per year should be removed from the herd. It has grown exponentially.”

There are between 330,000 and 410,000 grey seals living off the Atlantic coast — a 30-fold increase since the 1960s, the Fisheries Department says.

“When you look at it, seals aren’t vegetarians or vegans — they eat fish,” Ashfield said. “They do have an impact.”
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Withdraw Reckless WTO Challenge

Canadian and European Parliamentarians Join HSI Canada in Calling for Withdrawal of Reckless WTO Challenge Against EU Seal Product Trade Ban

More Parliamentarians are supporting our efforts to end the seal hunt. HSI

More Parliamentarians are supporting our efforts to end the seal hunt. HSI

Humane Society International/Canada
November 2, 2011
OTTAWA — Humane Society International/Canada, joined by the Honourable Mac Harb, Senator; Elizabeth May, Member of Parliament; and the Honourable David Martin, Member of the European Parliament; called upon the Canadian government to withdraw its World Trade Organisation challenge against the EU ban on seal product trade. The Parliamentarians urged the Canadian government to support Atlantic Canadian sealers and their families by implementing a federal buyout of the commercial sealing industry.
“As long as the Canadian government continues with its groundless WTO challenge against the EU prohibition on seal product trade, many members of the European Parliament are loath to ratify a free-trade agreement with Canada,” said David Martin, Member of the European Parliament and member of the Committee on International Trade of the European Parliament. “Not only does Canada’s challenge at the WTO jeopardise a multibillion dollar trade deal with Europe, but it is a complete attack on European values and democratic processes.”
“Canadians are increasingly frustrated at the refusal of the Harper government to respect the right of the EU to domestically ban its trade in products of commercial seal hunts,” said Senator Harb. “Canada’s cruel commercial seal slaughter produces little economic benefit, and now threatens relations with Canada’s second largest trading partner.”
“It is time for the Canadian government to stop throwing away millions of taxpayer dollars at the commercial seal hunt,” said Elizabeth May, Member of Parliament and leader of the Green Party of Canada. “Instead of propping up this dying industry with massive government subsidies, the Canadian government, for much less money, could buy out sealing licenses and develop sustainable economic alternatives for communities, such as seal watching.”
“With this WTO challenge, the Canadian government is putting the sealing industry above all others who may benefit from CETA,” said Rebecca Aldworth, executive director of Humane Society International/Canada. “The Canadian government must stop playing regional politics with the lives of baby seals, and listen to the overwhelming majority of Canadians that support the right of the EU to ban seal product trade.”
Background
Though polling shows 86 percent of Canadians supported the right of the EU to prohibit seal product trade, the Canadian government challenged the ban at the WTO in November 2009, and requested a dispute panel in February 2011 after consultations failed to resolve the matter.
In June 2011, the European Parliament adopted a Resolution threatening to block ratification of CETA if Canada fails to withdraw its WTO challenge. More than 100 MEPs have signed an open letter to the Canadian government saying the EU Parliament should not ratify CETA until Canada drops its challenge.
Canadian legal experts have estimated the cost of the WTO challenge to be about $10 million – more than thirteen times the landed value of the seal slaughter this year.

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Proposed Seal Cull In St. Lawrence Gulf Draws Fire From Top Scientists

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2011/09/25/proposed-seal-cull-slaughter-draws-criticism_n_979960.html

Posted: 9/25/11

From Canadian Press

HALIFAX – Two of Canada’s leading marine biologists and a conservation group say a five-year proposal to slaughter 140,000 grey seals in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence is being driven by politics, not science.

“I don’t support it,” said Hal Whitehead, a professor at Dalhousie University in Halifax who specializes in the study of whales. “From what I’ve seen of the rationale, it doesn’t make much sense to me.”

Earlier this month, a federal advisory panel urged Fisheries Minister Keith Ashfield to approve the cull, which would result in the killing of 70 per cent of the grey seals that feed in an area that stretches from Quebec’s Gaspe Peninsula to the east side of Cape Breton.

The Fisheries Resource Conservation Council, made up of scientists and fishing industry representatives appointed by the minister, said the proposed cull is an experiment that will test indirect scientific evidence suggesting grey seals are impeding the recovery of cod stocks.

Whitehead said the council’s description of the project as an experiment is laughable.

“There’s no control group,” he said in an interview, referring to the unaltered group in a scientific experiment that allows for comparison of results.

“In this case, there’s just one lot and you’re killing a large part of them. If the cod population goes up, it doesn’t necessarily mean the seals were to blame. … Disentangling relationships in the ocean is really tough.”

The professor also said that even though other predators eat cod, including some species of whales, the federal government seems intent on taking aim at seals to appease the fishing industry.

“In this part of the world … a substantial part of the population really dislikes seals,” Whitehead said.
Read the rest of this entry »

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Seal cull recommended for southern Gulf of St. Lawrence

bbouzane@postmedia.com
Twitter.com/bouzane
© Copyright (c) Postmedia News

A cull of thousands of grey seals in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence was among the recommendations made Thursday to federal Fisheries Minister Keith Ashfield in an effort to bolster groundfish stocks in the region.

The Fisheries Resource Conservation Council released its report aimed at recovering and sustaining the groundfish population. Eliminating 70 per cent of grey seals in the southern Gulf was identified among the 31 suggestions as a way to restore healthier groundfish stocks.

The southern Gulf ranges from New Brunswick to Nova Scotia.

In the report, the FRCC said that to protect existing groundfish numbers in the region, a reduction of the grey seal population to about 31,000 animals would be necessary, with an “initial reduction” of about 73,000 seals “within a year or two.”

Rebecca Aldworth, executive director of Humane Society International/Canada, said it is “absolutely reprehensible” to suggest such a measure.

“A cull of 70 per cent of the population would not be sustainable and could lead to the extrication of this species off our east coast,” Aldworth said Thursday. “The fact the FRCC would call for such a reckless move . . . speaks to the political motives of the FRCC . . . and is, in my opinion, the fishing industry attempting to divert attention from the irresponsible fishing practices that continue today.”

She insists there is a lack of scientific evidence to suggest that the grey seal population has a negative effect on the health of groundfish stocks and that overfishing remains the largest threat against cod and other fish in the region.
Read the rest of this entry »

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Humane Society International Calls for Immediate Action to End the Seal Hunt With the Release of Disturbing New Footage

http://www.marketwire.com/press-release/humane-society-international-calls-immediate-action-end-seal-hunt-with-release-disturbing-1526514.htm

June 14, 2011 10:00 ET

TORONTO, ONTARIO–(Marketwire – June 14, 2011) -

This document corrects and replaces the press release that was sent today at 10:00 am ET.

Humane Society International/Canada, joined by leading international veterinary expert, Dr Andy Butterworth, MRCVS held a news conference to release new video evidence of the cruelty at the 2011 commercial seal slaughter, which reveals flagrant violations of Canadian law and accepted guidelines on international humane killing standards. HSI/Canada is calling on Prime Minister Stephen Harper to take immediate action to end Canada’s commercial seal slaughter.

Read the rest of this entry »

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ENERIC FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE THAT MAY BE AVAILABLE TO HELP WITH VET BILLS

ENERIC FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE THAT MAY BE AVAILABLE TO HELP WITH VET BILLS
The following organizations may be able to provide some assistance for sick or injured pets:
The inclusion of a service, organization or program in this listing is NOT an endorsement or recommendation. We are not able to guarantee the quality of services or other groups. We strongly suggest that you check them out yourself before using a specific service.
The Animal Foundation:
http://www.theanimalfund.com
non-profit charity organization was built for animals, our efforts have always been for animals, and our  future development will consistently be towards animal  betterment and well-being.
American Animal Hospital Association, AAHA Helping Pets Fund
http://www.aahahelpingpets.org/home
The heartbreak happens all too often, a pet owner is unable to afford treatment and their sick or injured companion animal pays the price. If the owner is elderly, disabled or on a fixed income, the cost of care may be too much of a stretch for their pocketbook. Perhaps they have been victimized by crime, property loss or a job layoff and are experiencing a temporary financial hardshipî making it too difficult to afford pet care. And some animals, brought to clinics by Good Samaritans, don’t have an owner to pay for treatment. Whatever the situation, the fact remains the same, when sick or injured animals are unable to receive veterinary care, they suffer. Through the AAHA Helping Pets Fund, veterinary care is possible for sick or injured pets even if they have been abandoned or if their owner is experiencing financial hardship.
Angels 4 Animals
http://www.angels4animals.org
Angels4Animals, a non-profit organization and a program of Inner Voice Community Services, has a mission to serve as the guardian angel of animals whose caretakers find themselves in difficult financial situations. At Angels4Animals we believe that animal owners should not have to say goodbye to the animals that they love. Our work is accomplished in conjunction with veterinary clinics across the country, eager to assist as many animals, and their owners, as possible. Our services range from financial aid to complete treatment to those pets and pet owners in need.
Care Credit
http://www.carecredit.com
A credit card company for health care, including veterinary care. “CareCredit, the leader in patient/client financing, has helped more than 3 million patients/clients get the treatment or procedures they needed and wanted. With a comprehensive range of plan options, for treatment or procedure fees from $1 to over $25,000, we offer a plan and a low monthly payment to fit comfortably into almost every budget.
Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance (FVEAP)
http://www.fveap.org/sys-tmpl/door
Seniors, People with disabilities, People who have lost their job, Good Samaritans who rescue a cat or kitten – any of these folks may need financial assistance to save a beloved companion.” The Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance Program is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization that provides financial assistance to cat and kitten guardians who are unable to afford veterinary services to save their companions when life-threatening illness or injury strikes.
Help-A-Pet
http://www.help-a-pet.org
Our efforts focus on serving the elderly, the disabled, and the working poor. For lonely seniors, physically/mentally challenged individuals and children of working parents, pets represent much more than a diversion.
IMOM
http://www.imom.org
Mission Statement: Helping people help pets. To better the lives of sick, injured and abused companion animals. We are dedicated to insure that no companion animal has to be euthanized simply because their caretaker is financially challenged.
The Pet Fund
http://thepetfund.com
The Pet Fund is a registered 501(c)3 nonprofit association that provides financial assistance to owners of domestic animals who need urgent veterinary care. Often animals are put down or suffer needlessly because their owners cannot afford expensive surgery or emergency vet visits. Companion animal owners must often make the difficult decision to put an animal down or neglect urgent medical needs because of the costs involved. The purpose of the Pet Fund is to work towards a future where decisions about companion animal medical care need never be made on the basis of cost.
United Animal Nations
http://www.uan.org/lifeline
The mission of LifeLine is to help homeless or recently rescued animals suffering from life-threatening conditions that require specific and immediate emergency veterinary care. We strive to serve Good Samaritans and rescue groups who take in sick or injured animals. In certain cases, LifeLine can also assist senior citizens and low-income families pay for immediate emergency veterinary care.
UK Assistance with Veterinary Bills
http://www.petloversonline.co.uk/financial.htm
Most of us can cope with the financial commitment involved in the day to day care of our pets. However, how many of us come out in a cold sweat when our pet is ill or injured and we know we have to take it to the vet? Most of us are fortunate enough to be able to afford it but, some of us who love our animals dearly cannot. Unfortunately we do not have a PDSA or a RSPCA Centre within our area, but there are a few charities who may be able to help.
Injury Specific:
Dachshunds Needing IVDD surgery
http://members.rushmore.com/~dds/applyforhelp.htm
HandicappedPets.com
http://www.handicappedpets.com/Articles/help/
From time to time, HandicappedPets.com recognizes a caretaker of handicapped pets that need some special attention, and a little extra help. There are those who are so selflessly dedicated to their animal families that they give up a little more than they can afford.
Disease Specific:
Diabetic Pet Fund:
http://www.petdiabetes.net/fund/
Special Needs cats:
http://www.catsincrisis.org/crisisFund.html
Feline kidney disease:
http://www.catsincrisis.org/mesaFund.html
Feline heart and thyroid:
http://www.catsincrisis.org/stripesFund.html
Feline neurological disorder:
http://www.catsincrisis.org/gillieFund.html
Breed Specific:
Assistance dogs:
http://www.iaadp.org/VCP.html
Bernese Mountain Dog:
http://www.behaf.com/index.html
Corgi:
http://www.corgiaid.org/
Doberman:
http://www.doberman911.org/
Great Pyrenees:
http://www.angelfire.com/bc2/pyramedic/summary.html
Labrador retriever:
http://www.labmed.org/
http://www.labradorlifeline.org/
Pit Bulls:
http://www.pbrc.net/fund/financial.html
Westies:
http://www.westiemed.com/
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
CAT-SPECIFIC ASSISTANCE AND IDEAS
Financial Resources for Cat Care
https://www.alleycat.org/NetCommunity/Page.aspx?pid=649&srctid=1&erid=37\51607
Are you facing tough financial times and struggling to make ends meet for your entire familyóincluding your pets and feral cat colony? Alley Cat Allies has ideas on how to make providing care more affordable, including resources for obtaining food and for helping you cover emergency veterinary costs.
Feral Cat Colony Financial Help
If you are caring for a feral cat colony, there are multiple avenues to find support to help you obtain affordable or free food and shelter for the cats.
Resources for Obtaining Cat Food
Check for surplus food at your local humane society, or human food bank, or local food pantries. Feeding America has an online food bank locator at www.feedingamerica.org.
Ask your local market or pet supply store to donate broken packages or dented cans. Some retailers will also donate out-of-date products, which are still good for a few months longer than the sell-by date.
Ask local vet clinics if they have surplus or just-out-of-date premium pet foods that they are willing to donate.
Hold a cat food drive. Announce the drive in the local paper to collect donations from the public. Your workplace, local religious institutions, and civic or youth groups may be willing to help as well. Sometimes youth groups, clubs, and high schools require community projects that benefit both people and animals. Work with your local scout troop or volunteer organization on the drive for feral cat caregivers. Ask local markets and pet supply shops if you may put out an attractive bin requesting cat food donations.
Resources for Obtaining Shelters/Cat Houses for Feral Cats
Ask for scrap lumber from building supply stores or contractors, often available at little or no cost.
Place an ad asking for used dog houses. This could net several free shelters that, with minor improvements, can be made suitable for cats (usually insulation needs to be added and the door made smaller).
Host a shelter building party. Get together with other caregivers and/or your local feral cat organizationís supporters to build the houses together. Contact a local Boy or Girl Scout or other youth organization and ask interested youth to complete a service project to help build shelters.
Alley Cat Alliesí website shows several inexpensive shelters you can make yourself, available at www.alleycat.org/BuildAShelter (click on the second bullet).
Spay/Neuter Help
Alley Cat Alliesí Feral Friends Network is a group of organizations or individuals with feral cat expertise and veterinary practices and clinics that provide neuter surgeries for feral cats located in communities nationwide. Go to www.alleycat.org/response to locate a Feral Friend near you who may offer low-cost or subsidized spay/neuter surgery for feral cats.
Veterinary Care
Emergency veterinary care can be costly. These national organizations provide funds to those in need.
AAHA Helping Pets Fund (www.aahahelpingpets.org) – This fund helps those in need access quality veterinary care for sick or injured pets. Grants temporarily suspended but will begin again in July 2009.
Angels4Animals (www.angels4animals.org) – Friends or veterinarians use the ìcontact usî page to refer an animal family in need of financial assistance.
CareCredit (www.carecredit.com) – Offers a revolving line of credit for veterinary expenses.
Cats in Crisis (www.catsincrisis.org) – Helps individuals and humane organizations care for cats with chronic or emergency medical conditions through financial and fundraising assistance. Grants temporarily suspended, but check often for re-up date.
Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance Program (www.fveap.org/sys-tmpl/door/) ñ This program provides financial assistance to cat and kitten guardians who are unable to afford veterinary services to save their companions when life-threatening illness or injury strikes.
Help-A-Pet (www.help-a-pet.org) – Help-A-Pet provides financial assistance nationwide for the medical care of pets whose owners are unable to afford the expense; for individuals with income below $20,000 or a family income below $40,000.
IMOM (www.imom.org) – Financial assistance for life-threatening and emergency veterinary care. IMOM is dedicated to ensuring that no companion animal has to be euthanized simply because their caretaker is financially challenged.
The Pet Fund (www.thepetfund.com) – Provides financial assistance to owners of domestic animals who need urgent veterinary care.
United Animal Nations (www.uan.org/lifeline/index.html) ñ LifeLine grants help Good Samaritans, animal rescuers and low-income families with the high cost of caring for pets by providing grants to meet emergency veterinary expenses they otherwise couldnít afford.
Locale-Specific Veterinary Care
Many local shelters, humane societies, clinics, and pet organizations have special emergency funds to use for families who need special assistance within their communities. Here are a handful, some of which also provide additional help for ongoing animal care:
Atlanta – Pets Are Loving Support (www.palsatlanta.org/) – P.A.L.S. provides pet-care, including free food and basic veterinary care, and support to the companion pets of critically ill and disabled Atlantans.
Central Ohio – Pet Promise (www.petpromise.org/programs.html) – Provides financial assistance to low-income pet owners who canít afford medical care for their pets. Also sponsors Operation Fill-A-Bowl, providing free of charge, cat and dog food to pet owners who need assistance and to the caretakers of feral cat populations. Their City Kitty program provides vaccinations and spay/neuter surgeries for feral cats.
Connecticut Humane Society (www.cthumane.org) – The Connecticut Humane Societyís Fox Memorial Clinic is a full-service veterinary practice that provides veterinary care for animals whose owners are in financial need.
New York – NY Save (www.nysave.org) – Aid and assistance for low-income pet owners residing in one of the five boroughs of New York City, whose pet is in need of emergency veterinary care.
Northern Nevada/Lake Tahoe – Shakespeare Animal Fund (www.shakespeareanimalfund.org) – People in the Northern Nevada/Lake Tahoe area can apply for funds, with an emphasis on those on fixed incomes or with annual incomes below $35,000.
Salt Lake City – Pet Samaritan Fund (www.petsamaritan.org) – Provides financial assistance to Utah pet owners who cannot afford medical care for their pets due to extreme financial hardship (up to $100 upon receipt of veterinary billing statement).
San Francisco – Pets Are Wonderful Support (www.pawssf.org) – Provides for the comprehensive needs of companion animals for low-income persons with HIV/AIDS and other disabling illnesses, as well as senior citizens in the San Francisco area.
Washington, DC ñ Pets DC (www.petsdc.org) – Dedicated to improving the health and well being of people living with HIV/AIDS or other disabling conditions and their companion pets by providing public health education, exercise, pet food, veterinary care, grooming, foster care, and adoptions services at no cost to individuals in the Metropolitan Washington area.
Other Ideas for Getting Help
Work with your veterinarian. Some veterinarians may be willing to work out a payment plan with you, especially if you can provide some of the payment up front.
Contact friends and family and fundraise. Itís not easy asking for help. But when your animalís life hangs in the balance, it may be the best option to borrow money or hold a fundraiser.
Plan ahead. Cut costs and start a savings plan. Consider getting pet ownerís insurance to cover veterinary costs now to prepare for any tough times you may have ahead.
Get in touch with breed-specific groups. If your pet is a specific breed, the groups associated with it often have funds available to help provide the care your animal needs.
Facing Foreclosure?
The news is full of stories of animals losing their homes along with their pet parents due to home foreclosure. Some tips for dealing with this looming threat:
Educate yourself about ways to prevent foreclosure all together. The best way to keep your whole family together (pets and all) is to stay in your home. At http://makinghomeaffordable.gov/, you can see if you are eligible for government-sponsored foreclosure alternatives, such as refinancing or loan modifications.
No Paws Left Behind (http://nopawsleftbehind.org/paws/) is a nonprofit that provides tips for homeowners as well as an online network to get your pet into the safest place possible if needed.
Search for pet-friendly housing. Almost every local humane society or rescue group keeps a list of pet-friendly housing in the area. Some also offer mediation services to help you convince a potential landlord to allow the animal to come with you if it is not normally acceptable. To prepare for these discussions, gather proof of your responsibility toward your pet, including veterinary care and statements from others agreeing to your conscientiousness.
Work hard to find your animal the best temporary home possible. Talk with family, friends, co-workers, and neighbors. Ask your veterinarian about temporary boarding. Whatever you do, do not take your animal to an open-admission shelter, because they will likely be killed.

From Cheryl

Roads of Hope
Cheryl@RoadsofHope.org

The following organizations may be able to provide some assistance for sick or injured pets:

The inclusion of a service, organization or program in this listing is NOT an endorsement or recommendation. We are not able to guarantee the quality of services or other groups. We strongly suggest that you check them out yourself before using a specific service.

The Animal Foundation:

http://www.theanimalfund.com

non-profit charity organization was built for animals, our efforts have always been for animals, and our  future development will consistently be towards animal  betterment and well-being.

American Animal Hospital Association, AAHA Helping Pets Fund

http://www.aahahelpingpets.org/home

The heartbreak happens all too often, a pet owner is unable to afford treatment and their sick or injured companion animal pays the price. If the owner is elderly, disabled or on a fixed income, the cost of care may be too much of a stretch for their pocketbook. Perhaps they have been victimized by crime, property loss or a job layoff and are experiencing a temporary financial hardshipî making it too difficult to afford pet care. And some animals, brought to clinics by Good Samaritans, don’t have an owner to pay for treatment. Whatever the situation, the fact remains the same, when sick or injured animals are unable to receive veterinary care, they suffer. Through the AAHA Helping Pets Fund, veterinary care is possible for sick or injured pets even if they have been abandoned or if their owner is experiencing financial hardship.

Angels 4 Animals

http://www.angels4animals.org

Angels4Animals, a non-profit organization and a program of Inner Voice Community Services, has a mission to serve as the guardian angel of animals whose caretakers find themselves in difficult financial situations. At Angels4Animals we believe that animal owners should not have to say goodbye to the animals that they love. Our work is accomplished in conjunction with veterinary clinics across the country, eager to assist as many animals, and their owners, as possible. Our services range from financial aid to complete treatment to those pets and pet owners in need.

Care Credit

http://www.carecredit.com

A credit card company for health care, including veterinary care. “CareCredit, the leader in patient/client financing, has helped more than 3 million patients/clients get the treatment or procedures they needed and wanted. With a comprehensive range of plan options, for treatment or procedure fees from $1 to over $25,000, we offer a plan and a low monthly payment to fit comfortably into almost every budget.

Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance (FVEAP)

http://www.fveap.org/sys-tmpl/door

Seniors, People with disabilities, People who have lost their job, Good Samaritans who rescue a cat or kitten – any of these folks may need financial assistance to save a beloved companion.” The Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance Program is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization that provides financial assistance to cat and kitten guardians who are unable to afford veterinary services to save their companions when life-threatening illness or injury strikes.

Help-A-Pet

http://www.help-a-pet.org

Our efforts focus on serving the elderly, the disabled, and the working poor. For lonely seniors, physically/mentally challenged individuals and children of working parents, pets represent much more than a diversion.

IMOM

http://www.imom.org

Mission Statement: Helping people help pets. To better the lives of sick, injured and abused companion animals. We are dedicated to insure that no companion animal has to be euthanized simply because their caretaker is financially challenged.

The Pet Fund

http://thepetfund.com

The Pet Fund is a registered 501(c)3 nonprofit association that provides financial assistance to owners of domestic animals who need urgent veterinary care. Often animals are put down or suffer needlessly because their owners cannot afford expensive surgery or emergency vet visits. Companion animal owners must often make the difficult decision to put an animal down or neglect urgent medical needs because of the costs involved. The purpose of the Pet Fund is to work towards a future where decisions about companion animal medical care need never be made on the basis of cost.

United Animal Nations

http://www.uan.org/lifeline

The mission of LifeLine is to help homeless or recently rescued animals suffering from life-threatening conditions that require specific and immediate emergency veterinary care. We strive to serve Good Samaritans and rescue groups who take in sick or injured animals. In certain cases, LifeLine can also assist senior citizens and low-income families pay for immediate emergency veterinary care.

UK Assistance with Veterinary Bills

http://www.petloversonline.co.uk/financial.htm

Most of us can cope with the financial commitment involved in the day to day care of our pets. However, how many of us come out in a cold sweat when our pet is ill or injured and we know we have to take it to the vet? Most of us are fortunate enough to be able to afford it but, some of us who love our animals dearly cannot. Unfortunately we do not have a PDSA or a RSPCA Centre within our area, but there are a few charities who may be able to help.

Injury Specific:

Dachshunds Needing IVDD surgery

http://members.rushmore.com/~dds/applyforhelp.htm

HandicappedPets.com

http://www.handicappedpets.com/Articles/help/

From time to time, HandicappedPets.com recognizes a caretaker of handicapped pets that need some special attention, and a little extra help. There are those who are so selflessly dedicated to their animal families that they give up a little more than they can afford.

Disease Specific:

Diabetic Pet Fund:

http://www.petdiabetes.net/fund/

Special Needs cats:

http://www.catsincrisis.org/crisisFund.html

Feline kidney disease:

http://www.catsincrisis.org/mesaFund.html

Feline heart and thyroid:

http://www.catsincrisis.org/stripesFund.html

Feline neurological disorder:

http://www.catsincrisis.org/gillieFund.html

Breed Specific:

Assistance dogs:

http://www.iaadp.org/VCP.html

Bernese Mountain Dog:

http://www.behaf.com/index.html

Corgi:

http://www.corgiaid.org/

Doberman:

http://www.doberman911.org/

Great Pyrenees:

http://www.angelfire.com/bc2/pyramedic/summary.html

Labrador retriever:

http://www.labmed.org/

http://www.labradorlifeline.org/

Pit Bulls:

http://www.pbrc.net/fund/financial.html

Westies:

http://www.westiemed.com/

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

CAT-SPECIFIC ASSISTANCE AND IDEAS

Financial Resources for Cat Care

https://www.alleycat.org/NetCommunity/Page.aspx?pid=649&srctid=1&erid=37\51607

Are you facing tough financial times and struggling to make ends meet for your entire familyóincluding your pets and feral cat colony? Alley Cat Allies has ideas on how to make providing care more affordable, including resources for obtaining food and for helping you cover emergency veterinary costs.

Feral Cat Colony Financial Help

If you are caring for a feral cat colony, there are multiple avenues to find support to help you obtain affordable or free food and shelter for the cats.

Resources for Obtaining Cat Food

Check for surplus food at your local humane society, or human food bank, or local food pantries. Feeding America has an online food bank locator at www.feedingamerica.org.

Ask your local market or pet supply store to donate broken packages or dented cans. Some retailers will also donate out-of-date products, which are still good for a few months longer than the sell-by date.

Ask local vet clinics if they have surplus or just-out-of-date premium pet foods that they are willing to donate.

Hold a cat food drive. Announce the drive in the local paper to collect donations from the public. Your workplace, local religious institutions, and civic or youth groups may be willing to help as well. Sometimes youth groups, clubs, and high schools require community projects that benefit both people and animals. Work with your local scout troop or volunteer organization on the drive for feral cat caregivers. Ask local markets and pet supply shops if you may put out an attractive bin requesting cat food donations.

Resources for Obtaining Shelters/Cat Houses for Feral Cats

Ask for scrap lumber from building supply stores or contractors, often available at little or no cost.

Place an ad asking for used dog houses. This could net several free shelters that, with minor improvements, can be made suitable for cats (usually insulation needs to be added and the door made smaller).

Host a shelter building party. Get together with other caregivers and/or your local feral cat organizationís supporters to build the houses together. Contact a local Boy or Girl Scout or other youth organization and ask interested youth to complete a service project to help build shelters.

Alley Cat Alliesí website shows several inexpensive shelters you can make yourself, available at www.alleycat.org/BuildAShelter (click on the second bullet).

Spay/Neuter Help

Alley Cat Alliesí Feral Friends Network is a group of organizations or individuals with feral cat expertise and veterinary practices and clinics that provide neuter surgeries for feral cats located in communities nationwide. Go to www.alleycat.org/response to locate a Feral Friend near you who may offer low-cost or subsidized spay/neuter surgery for feral cats.

Veterinary Care

Emergency veterinary care can be costly. These national organizations provide funds to those in need.

AAHA Helping Pets Fund (www.aahahelpingpets.org) – This fund helps those in need access quality veterinary care for sick or injured pets. Grants temporarily suspended but will begin again in July 2009.

Angels4Animals (www.angels4animals.org) – Friends or veterinarians use the ìcontact usî page to refer an animal family in need of financial assistance.

CareCredit (www.carecredit.com) – Offers a revolving line of credit for veterinary expenses.

Cats in Crisis (www.catsincrisis.org) – Helps individuals and humane organizations care for cats with chronic or emergency medical conditions through financial and fundraising assistance. Grants temporarily suspended, but check often for re-up date.

Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance Program (www.fveap.org/sys-tmpl/door/) ñ This program provides financial assistance to cat and kitten guardians who are unable to afford veterinary services to save their companions when life-threatening illness or injury strikes.

Help-A-Pet (www.help-a-pet.org) – Help-A-Pet provides financial assistance nationwide for the medical care of pets whose owners are unable to afford the expense; for individuals with income below $20,000 or a family income below $40,000.

IMOM (www.imom.org) – Financial assistance for life-threatening and emergency veterinary care. IMOM is dedicated to ensuring that no companion animal has to be euthanized simply because their caretaker is financially challenged.

The Pet Fund (www.thepetfund.com) – Provides financial assistance to owners of domestic animals who need urgent veterinary care.

United Animal Nations (www.uan.org/lifeline/index.html) ñ LifeLine grants help Good Samaritans, animal rescuers and low-income families with the high cost of caring for pets by providing grants to meet emergency veterinary expenses they otherwise couldnít afford.

Locale-Specific Veterinary Care

Many local shelters, humane societies, clinics, and pet organizations have special emergency funds to use for families who need special assistance within their communities. Here are a handful, some of which also provide additional help for ongoing animal care:

Atlanta – Pets Are Loving Support (www.palsatlanta.org/) – P.A.L.S. provides pet-care, including free food and basic veterinary care, and support to the companion pets of critically ill and disabled Atlantans.

Central Ohio – Pet Promise (www.petpromise.org/programs.html) – Provides financial assistance to low-income pet owners who canít afford medical care for their pets. Also sponsors Operation Fill-A-Bowl, providing free of charge, cat and dog food to pet owners who need assistance and to the caretakers of feral cat populations. Their City Kitty program provides vaccinations and spay/neuter surgeries for feral cats.

Connecticut Humane Society (www.cthumane.org) – The Connecticut Humane Societyís Fox Memorial Clinic is a full-service veterinary practice that provides veterinary care for animals whose owners are in financial need.

New York – NY Save (www.nysave.org) – Aid and assistance for low-income pet owners residing in one of the five boroughs of New York City, whose pet is in need of emergency veterinary care.

Northern Nevada/Lake Tahoe – Shakespeare Animal Fund (www.shakespeareanimalfund.org) – People in the Northern Nevada/Lake Tahoe area can apply for funds, with an emphasis on those on fixed incomes or with annual incomes below $35,000.

Salt Lake City – Pet Samaritan Fund (www.petsamaritan.org) – Provides financial assistance to Utah pet owners who cannot afford medical care for their pets due to extreme financial hardship (up to $100 upon receipt of veterinary billing statement).

San Francisco – Pets Are Wonderful Support (www.pawssf.org) – Provides for the comprehensive needs of companion animals for low-income persons with HIV/AIDS and other disabling illnesses, as well as senior citizens in the San Francisco area.

Washington, DC ñ Pets DC (www.petsdc.org) – Dedicated to improving the health and well being of people living with HIV/AIDS or other disabling conditions and their companion pets by providing public health education, exercise, pet food, veterinary care, grooming, foster care, and adoptions services at no cost to individuals in the Metropolitan Washington area.

Other Ideas for Getting Help

Work with your veterinarian. Some veterinarians may be willing to work out a payment plan with you, especially if you can provide some of the payment up front.

Contact friends and family and fundraise. Itís not easy asking for help. But when your animalís life hangs in the balance, it may be the best option to borrow money or hold a fundraiser.

Plan ahead. Cut costs and start a savings plan. Consider getting pet ownerís insurance to cover veterinary costs now to prepare for any tough times you may have ahead.

Get in touch with breed-specific groups. If your pet is a specific breed, the groups associated with it often have funds available to help provide the care your animal needs.

Facing Foreclosure?

The news is full of stories of animals losing their homes along with their pet parents due to home foreclosure. Some tips for dealing with this looming threat:

Educate yourself about ways to prevent foreclosure all together. The best way to keep your whole family together (pets and all) is to stay in your home. At http://makinghomeaffordable.gov/, you can see if you are eligible for government-sponsored foreclosure alternatives, such as refinancing or loan modifications.

No Paws Left Behind (http://nopawsleftbehind.org/paws/) is a nonprofit that provides tips for homeowners as well as an online network to get your pet into the safest place possible if needed.

Search for pet-friendly housing. Almost every local humane society or rescue group keeps a list of pet-friendly housing in the area. Some also offer mediation services to help you convince a potential landlord to allow the animal to come with you if it is not normally acceptable. To prepare for these discussions, gather proof of your responsibility toward your pet, including veterinary care and statements from others agreeing to your conscientiousness.

Work hard to find your animal the best temporary home possible. Talk with family, friends, co-workers, and neighbors. Ask your veterinarian about temporary boarding. Whatever you do, do not take your animal to an open-admission shelter, because they will likely be killed.

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Urgent plea for dogs surgery

Posted on October 27, 2010 by Amy

Sorry to keep asking for your help in spreading this fundraising plea.   We had a dog last week that had to go in for urgent back surgery and our medical expenses on her ended up being more than $5700.
Here are the details of the dog that had all of this emergency medical:  Help Minnie get her wiggle back
We now owe an immediate balance for her surgery of $1689.50 and I need to once again make a push for donations, any amount, no amount is too small.  If we can just get the word out, and reach a lot of people quickly?
There is a paypal button right on the link to Minnie’s fundraising page, or if anyone would prefer to call in a donation directly to the surgical center, I have posted her bill online as well (they should just email me so I can follow up that the vet’s office did indeed apply it to Minnie’s bill)

Reaching out and asking for donations and financial help is about the hardest thing for me to do, but this is an urgent situation.  Thank you for passing this foward to everyone you know whom might want to support Camp Cocker Rescue.
With much love and gratitude,?Cathy and the cockers?CampCocker.com

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National Pit Awareness

Posted on October 28, 2010 by Amy

Last Friday, the Devore Shelter said in Observance of National Pit Awareness, they were going to KILL all their in-house shelter pits on Saturday.  This shelter has heartless staff.  At any rate, a massive campaign pledge was launched to save all 19 pits and the story is below.  These ladies all deserve halos and a cherished blessing..  They saved even more dogs and the stupid shelter staff had said they could not do it.  Surprise.
From: alexandra <healingtouch108@aol.com>
Dear All:    As many of you know, the amazing Devore Team (led by Royce & Rae while Pat enjoys a little break) pulled 18 pits, a cocker spaniel and 5 pittie pups this past Saturday which was National Pit Awareness Day.  Originally we had sent an email for pledges to cover the pull fees of 19 pits but only 18 pits were pulled (the cocker and puppies ended up being add-ons). So why was one pit missing?? Who was the 19th pit? And why was he not pulled?
Well on Saturday the 19th pit displayed some not-so-nice behavior towards his kennel mate, getting into a scuffle.  In the midst of the pulling of all the other dogs, it was too risky to take him out and put him in a foster home with other dogs.  So he became the pit left behind…but not forgotten and certainly not left behind for good.
On Saturday night we hatched a plan…pulled by our heart strings and by his sad photo.  Royce and Rae went back again to give him another chance.  On Sunday we bought him another day’s reprieve. On Monday, he stayed towards the back of his kennel and tried to approach Rae but was unsure; and when she left, he came to the front and looked after her, as if to say “Where are you going?”  Today, Royce met him and he was in a more playful mood! He smelled her hand and took treats. He seems to be fine with people but shy and unsure and either food or dog aggressive. He is very skinny…and may have been a junkyard dog.
Tonight he was officially sprung ! But his journey is not over. He will get neutered Friday and then go into a boarding facility where a great trainer has agreed to work with him 3 -4 times a week for a month.  We need to raise $500 for his training (which is an EXCELLENT price from the trainer!!) and about $450 for a month’s boarding (still working out where he will go for boarding so am estimating $15 per day).?**Please note: we have pulled him on good faith that the rescue community will rally behind this boy. I am sorry to ask for donations again, but I cannot pay his $950 myself. ***  There was a lot of interest in this dog on facebook so I really hope people will help in his rehab efforts.  If anyone does not know me and does not feel comfortable donating to me directly, I will be happy to get an address from teh trainer where checks can be sent.
If you would like to donate for Sweet Albert, the 19th pit, please paypal healingtouch108@aol.com?Will set up a chip-in as soon as i can but for now, paypal is fine. Thanks for believing in this scared doggy.

Hope to have more AFTER photos soon! – Alexandra

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